10 books on Executive Function and Related Learning Needs

To close the series of recent posts related to executive function, it seemed sensible to share some of the texts that I have consulted when working with students to develop tailored support for executive function. The list is not exhaustive, and if you would like more information or suggestions for where to go next, please feel free to get in touch via the comments, contact page or sidebar .

For Parents and Educators

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Mathematics and Problem-Solving

Where learners’ EF (Executive Function) is underdeveloped and/or working memory is overloaded, mathematics can pose real challenges that go beyond understanding numbers or carrying our calculations. It’s common for EF to impact maths, not least because of the importance of sequencing, and EF difficulties can co-occur with dyscalculia as with dyslexia. Read more

Language and Literacy

It may be obvious, but, for best results, start at the beginning! Even children whose executive function (EF) is developing well do not begin to visualise and verbalise until they are at least pre-school age. At this point, some whole class or group activities and tools might be reading a book or telling a story together and discussing it to clarify the language and expand on the detail. This can be built on by asking children to close their eyes and give a single word to describe a character/object from the story. Develop this further e.g.

  • Taking a single page in a picture book and finding words to describe an image
  • Discussing characters’ feelings
  • Finding different ways to describe the same thing
  • Taking the story’s theme and making
    • Imaginative play in a corner with child-size props and dress-up
    • Small world table-top activities
    • Creative activities, including cutting and sticking, malleable, construction
    • Playground adaptations of all of the above

school_reader

  • When supporting children in any of the creative tasks individually or in small groups, revisiting the language building activities (gently and appropriately – if it’s forced and slavish, they’ll know and you will all be bored)

Later, when children are becoming independent writers, talk about language, find alternative words and more descriptive choices, discuss words and their origins and meaning (can also help with spelling, but more on that another time). This needs to become second nature to your teaching as well as to their learning, part of the fabric of any lesson, with visual and physical props and prompts to stimulate and extend talk and written work.

If this important groundwork happens in the whole class (or family) setting, then children with well-developed skills have a chance to shine and their expertise can boost peers’ understanding and progress. More importantly, if some children are left behind despite these efforts, we can see who needs help. In some cases, this may be the time to call on a qualified and experienced speech and language therapist or other professional, if one is not already involved. Other children may benefit substantially from smaller school-based group, paired or individual intervention, taking a step back to consolidate earlier skills in a quieter environment. (Talk Boost is great for this!)


Bear in mind that the brain’s executive functions, which facilitate processing of instructions, are still very much in the developmental stages throughout primary/elementary school. At home, in nursery and pre-school, children learn to follow simple commands, consisting of words and gestures. Gradually they begin to interpret more complex instructions, with perhaps two or three steps, sometimes reading cues such as facial expressions to be sure they have complied correctly. EF weaknesses can mean that these skills are underdeveloped. If following verbal instructions poses challenges although it’s been a requirement for most children since toddlerhood, then it is likely that the demands of a written comprehension task or multiple step maths problem will be exhausting, frustrating and demoralising.

This kind of interaction with books and language, as already discussed, is a real boost for early aural and reading comprehension skills. If students have learnt the conventions of written language through listening to texts read, they will have an easier time when they come to read them independently.


If a learner’s difficulties here are due to difficulties with reading and writing such as co-occurring dyslexia, then that must be addressed separately, but EF-supporting strategies can still be useful for such students as an additional tool. Support for learners with dyslexia deserves to be written about in detail. Look out for that in a future post.

More blogs on reading and writing can be found here:

More blogs on executive function can be found here:

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Lightening the Load

overloadLast month I began a series of posts about executive function (EF) and how it can affect students’ learning, starting with an introduction and following with thoughts on classroom and homework situations. It’s time to look at some of the strategies already touched on in a bit more detail.

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Homework

Executive functions (Explained in more detail here: EF – an introduction) develop from early childhood and are seen as key predictors of academic outcome and life chances in the modern world. I discussed how EF difficulties might present or be supported in the classroom in EF and Learning – Classroom Survival.

Some students with underdeveloped EF find the demands of school overwhelming from the very start, whereas for others, classroom routines, resources and support can be a benefit. In both cases, homework is likely to pose a challenge, particularly as they grow older, since such independent tasks place significant burden on EF.

When a child or young person has underdeveloped EF they

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It will get easier

Sometimes classroom teachers or students’ parents express their frustration at the time or effort it seems to take a learner to complete a task the adult feels should be within their reach. When that happens, I ask them to try this activity, which was once demonstrated to me by an OT. Try it for yourself: Read more